Are You Willing to Be Wrong?

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ admin_label=”section” _builder_version=”3.0.47″][et_pb_row admin_label=”row” _builder_version=”3.0.48″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.0.47″ parallax=”off” parallax_method=”on”][et_pb_text admin_label=”Text” _builder_version=”3.13.1″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”] Over the course of this past week, we began a new mentoring mastermind group called Infinite Potential, Infinite Possibilities. One of the basic premises of the program comes from a quote by Arnold Patent I shared in The Inside-Out Revolution:

“We don’t create abundance. Abundance is always present.

We create limitation.”

In other words, the limits on the current level of potential we are tapping into in ourselves and possibility we are seeing in the world are created in our own thinking. As each invisible boundary of thought becomes visible, we see it for what it is – an artificial and often arbitrary line in the ever-shifting sand of our own imagination. The moment we see that we’re the ones who’ve made up the edge of our world is the moment our world gets bigger; the moment we see that we’re the ones who’ve decided not to look for new possibilities is the moment new things become possible.

Therefore the only thing which stands between us and the freedom we seek is our own unrecognized certainty that the world we see is the “real world” and not a vividly imagined projection of the mind.

By way of example, one of the participants in the group was facing a seemingly intractable dilemma around their job. When I asked them if they’d be willing for the situation to change, they said “yes” but then went on to explain why it couldn’t. The reason I knew they were wrong without having to know anything about their job or personal history is that there’s no such ‘thing’ as a ‘situation’ – we create ‘situations’ via the principles of Thought and Consciousness.

Thought is the principle behind creation – the infinite play-dough that makes up the world we see around us. It is the film strip that creates the specific version of the world we think is real out of the infinite possible versions waiting to be created.

Consciousness is the principle behind awareness – the light that brings our thinking to life and the movie screen that allows us to experience the projections of the mind as if they’re happening to us instead of coming from us.

Together, thought and consciousness create the illusion of a fixed, unchanging reality. We can see and feel what looks like the edge of the world and even point to the dragons who live there. After all, everyone knows a story about someone who started getting ideas above their station and wound up being swallowed alive. Yet what about every time you’ve stepped over the edge of your world and survived? Did we just get lucky, or could it be that “edges” only exist in the limited world of our own imagination?

After a bit of exploration of the illusory nature of our thought-created limitations, I asked a second question:

Are you open to finding new ways to make money?

While you might think that’s an easy enough question to answer, it completely stumped the participant. In fact, I was only able to get an answer after multiple attempts when I wrote the question on the board and offered a simple multiple choice of answers:

a) Yes
b) No

Much to all our surprise, the answer they circled was “No”.

Bizarre as that may seem at first glance, think about it for yourself. Where in your life are you bumping up against the limitations created by your own imagination? Where do you think you already know what’s possible and what’s not? In what area or areas of your life are you trying to order off a limited menu, unaware that there’s a chef in the kitchen waiting to whip up something brand new if only you’ll put in the order?

For me, I realized it was around awakening– I haven’t been open to a version of enlightenment that didn’t involve giving up everything I hold dear. For another person in the group, it was around dating. They realized they’d gone out into the online dating world with “assholes on their eyeballs”, so despite spending a lot of time and going on a lot of dates, they were literally unable to see anyone worth investing more time with.

It’s what we think we know that holds us back; it’s what we’re open to being wrong about that opens up a wider world. And this is the key to expanding into the natural abundance of possibility that surrounds us:

 When we open our minds to seeing something new, we inevitably see new things.

Here’s a simple experiment you can do to see this more clearly for yourself:

  1. Ask yourself a series of “I am willing…” questions until you bump into an edge. You’ll know you’ve hit an edge because the answer to the question won’t be an unqualified, no brainer “yes”.

Examples:

  • Am I willing to succeed?
  • Am I willing to succeed at ______?
  • Am I willing to love what I do?
  • Am I willing to love what I am doing now?
  • Am I willing to be happy and content without anything in my life changing?
  1. Ask yourself if you’re open to seeing something new about the apparent edge of your world. This may be more difficult than you expect, as most of us aren’t really open to being wrong about the way we currently see “reality”.

Once you find an edge and open up to seeing something new beyond it, prepare for your reality to change….

Have fun, learn heaps, and happy exploring!

With all my love,
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